When it comes to travel insurance, stability for pre-existing conditions can be a tricky topic to understand. To keep things simple, we’ve outlined everything you need to know about stability in relation to travel insurance, along with a few short examples to help you understand how coverage applies in different scenarios! Interested in learning more? Read on.

What is a pre-existing medical condition? 

The definition of pre-existing condition varies depending on what plan you purchase, but for TuGo® Travel Insurance Emergency Medical plans, a pre-existing condition is a dental or medical condition, illness or injury:

  1. That has been diagnosed, and for which you have consulted or received dental or medical treatment before the date you leave for your trip; or,
  2. That has not yet been diagnosed, and for which you were experiencing symptoms before the date you leave for your trip; or,
  3. That is a medically recognized complication or recurrence, whether or not the condition was diagnosed before the date you leave for your trip. 
Travel insurance policy
When planning your trip, prep yourself by learning the ins and outs of your travel insurance policy.

What is a 7-day exclusion and when does it apply?

For TuGo Travel Insurance policies, a 7-day exclusion may apply to travellers 59 and under, depending on the trip length (you’ll need to check your policy and/or contact your local insurance professional to confirm required stability periods based on trip length). The exclusion applies in the 7 days leading up to the departure date if your pre-existing condition flairs up, gets worse, requires medical treatment, or develops but remains undiagnosed before departure. 

Does testing affect stability? 

If you require frequent medical testing, you may be wondering if testing affects stability.

Doctor advising senior.
Medical testing won’t affect your pre-existing condition coverage unless there’s a change in your condition.

There are no exclusions for routine check-up tests or routine monitoring tests leading up to the departure date, and testing won’t affect your pre-existing condition coverage unless there’s a change in your condition. For example:

71-year-old Eleanor goes for routine tests to monitor her lung condition every 3 months, and takes a test within the required stability period* before she leaves for her cruise. As long as she meets all requirements to be considered stable, she may be covered (subject to conditions and exclusions).

*Check your policy wording to confirm required stability periods based on age and trip length

For further learning, check our guide for finding the right travel medical insurance for seniors and see how unstable pre-existing conditions impact claims.

Have a few more questions on the topic? Leave them below!

Happy travels,

Linnea

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